7 Crucial Tips For Managers Preparing For A Post-COVID Workplace

JULIAN LUTE

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The IT-BPM industry is a major forex earner for the Philippines. Thanks to the WFH (Work From Home) arrangement, this industry grew in 2020 creating 23,000 new jobs, and 100,000 more in 2021. 

It would seem beneficial to support the needs of a growing industry that brings in billions of pesos per year by allowing them to continue this arrangement for as long as they require (as IBPAP agrees), but for more economic reasons, they are now directed to return to work or risk losing their tax incentives. The industry is ready to compromise by asking the government to allow hybrid work—a setup that would grant clients and employees more flexibility, thus making them more competitive to other countries who have an advantage in technology.

Retaining top talents may be a challenge with this directive and may pose a lot of disadvantages to the companies and their people. For now, it is mandated. Leaders of the IT-BPM industry would have to comply and be ready to return to work in the new normal; bringing new challenges to their workplace culture. How will they engage their top talent who prefer the WFH or hybrid arrangement? What we’ve learned over the years from recognizing the Best Workplaces™ in the Philippines is that employee engagement need not be confined by any physical set-up. Real engagement requires a more human-centric, people-first approach that extends beyond the boundaries of physical space.

What do you do when your CEO wants employees to return to the office but you know they don’t want to?

Many HR leaders have listened to their employees and know that mixed feelings about coming back to the office exist. The bigger challenge for some of these leaders is a lack of support from the top.

It’s a tough spot to be in, but Great Place to Work® has some advice for leaders dealing with resistant CEOs: You have to get under the hood and understand why. Both CEOs and employees are juggling a new reality and changing expectations of the future of work.

Is your CEO concerned about the financial implications of employees being out of the office, such as holding leases for unused office space? Is there a sense that innovation is suffering? Is there concern that the distinct culture you’ve created is at risk?

Encouraging leaders, especially the CEO, to share their perspectives and concerns, is a strong step toward building trust in the process of listening and creating a path forward.

Next, HR leaders have to validate their feelings and find out what’s on their employees minds. Listen to employee perspectives using various channels, including focused employee surveys, manager conversations, and all-hands meetings.

Ask employees about their outside-of-work responsibilities and what they would need to feel safe and comfortable to return to the office in some fashion. Be prepared to have your assumptions challenged by the reasons and feelings employees have about returning to the office.

How to prepare for an office “new normal”

Once your CEO has committed to a return-to-office strategy, make sure these are part of your approach:

7 crucial steps for a successful return to the office after COVID

1. Communicate often about plans to return to the office

Prepare people for the new work arrangement with regular communications and recognize that many people are still experiencing uncertainty and will need to adjust.

2. Give specific time frames

Make sure people are clear when the return to office process kicks off. Giving timeframes will also alleviate some of your employees’ mental load attached to uncertainty.

3. Consider how productivity can be different person to person

What people want in returning to the office or staying home depends on an individual’s job responsibilities as well as their style and personality. Some employees thrive in a convivial office space, while others do their best work in the serenity of their home.

Working on a synchronous schedule can improve coordination, but it can also introduce constant communications and interruptions that disrupt focus. Managers need to think about asynchronous schedules in addition to where people work.

4. Innovate with all

Some might be quick to put the onus squarely on the manager to make the decisions, but we think this is an opportunity to practice innovation and collaboration. As a manager, give people options and guidelines to decide what works best for them.

5. Reflect on fairness and inclusivity

Fairness should always be top of mind, and during this transition, there is a good chance concerns about favoritism will arise and that people may be left out or treated unfairly.

With promotions more often handed to those in close proximity, how does this fare for people on remote schedules? Think about your process for promotions and other areas that could hinder an equitable hybrid workplace.

6. Build in flexibility

The pandemic is still raging and depending on where people live, vaccinations may be a long way off and outbreaks will continue. Be prepared to pivot and pivot again.

7. Commit to ongoing evaluation and assessment

Ask employees at least quarterly about their experience so the business can respond quickly to support their ever-evolving needs. For a clear and nuanced insight, employee pulse surveys get to the crux of the issue and invite honest feedback.

How to support your employees in a return to the office

No matter what your return to the office looks like, supporting and engaging with your employees along the way is key. Making sure people feel they have choices to fit their needs is key to retaining top talent.

You must continue to ask:

  • Do employees feel supported by their colleagues as they return to work? 
  • Do employees feel they have the tools to go to work safely? 
  • Do employees feel their workplace also supports their responsibilities at home? 
  • Do employees trust their leaders’ decisions? 
  • Do employees feel like they have a say in how they work? 

Surveying your employees on their thoughts about returning to work will ensure a successful – and hopefully dread-free – transition.

Thinking about reopening your offices? Perhaps a pulse check will come in handy. Conduct a survey with Great Place to Work®, and find out how your employees feel in real time.

JULIAN LUTE

Author

Great Place To Work identifies Best Workplaces™ in Asia by surveying over 1 million employees in Asia and the Middle East about the key factors that create great workplaces for all and analyzing company workplace programs impacting over 4.7 million employees in the region.

To be considered, companies must first be identified as outstanding in their local region by appearing on one or more of our Best Workplaces lists in Greater China (including China, Hong Kong and Taiwan), India, Indonesia, Japan, Kuwait, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, UAE, Vietnam during 2021 or early 2022.

Companies rank in three size categories: Small and Medium (10-499 employees); Large (500+); and Multinational. Multinational organizations are also assessed on their efforts to create great workplaces across multiple countries in the region. They must appear on at least two national lists in Asia and the Middle East and have at least 1,000 employees worldwide with at least 40% (or 5,000) of those employees located outside the headquarters country.

Great Place To Work identifies Best Workplaces in Asia™ by surveying 2.1 million employees in Asia and the Middle East about the key factors that create great workplaces for all and analyzing company workplace programs impacting 5.9 million employees in the region.

To be considered, companies must first be identified as outstanding in their local region by appearing on one or more of our Best Workplaces lists in Bahrain, Greater China (including China, Hong Kong and Taiwan), India, Indonesia, Japan, Kuwait, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, UAE, Vietnam during 2022 or early 2023.

Companies rank in three size categories: Small and Medium (10-499 employees); Large (500+); and Multinational. Multinational organizations are also assessed on their efforts to create great workplaces across multiple countries in the region. They must appear on at least two national lists in Asia and the Middle East and have at least 1,000 employees worldwide with at least 40% (or 5,000+) of those employees located outside the headquarters country.

For All™ Methodology

Great Place To Work, the global authority on workplace culture, determined the Philippines Best Workplaces™ 2023 List by conducting annual workforce studies through our Trust Index Survey™ and Culture Management platform Emprising®, representing the voices of over 450,000 employees across the Philippines.

Employees responded to over 60 survey questions describing the extent to which their organization creates a great place to work For All™, meaning that the company empowers all individuals to reach their full human potential. Eighty-five percent of the evaluation is based on what employees report about their experiences of trust and reaching their full human potential as part of their organization, no matter who they are or what they do. We analyze these experiences relative to each organization’s size, workforce makeup, and what’s typical in their industry and region. The remainder of the evaluation is an assessment of all employees’ daily experiences of the company’s values, people’s ability to contribute new ideas, and the effectiveness of their leaders to ensure they’re consistently experienced.

To ensure surveys truly represent all employees, we require enough people in each organization to respond that results are accurate to a 95% confidence level and 5% margin of error or better. We review any anomalies in survey responses, news, and financial performance to ensure there aren’t any extraordinary reasons to believe we couldn’t trust a company’s survey results.

For All™ Methodology

Great Place to Work, the global authority on workplace culture, determined the Philippines Best Workplaces™ 2022 List by conducting annual workforce studies through our Trust Index Survey™ and Culture Management platform Emprising®, representing the voices of over 130,000 employees across the Philippines.

Employees responded to over 60 survey questions describing the extent to which their organization creates a great place to work For All™, meaning that the company empowers all individuals to reach their full human potential. Eighty-five percent of the evaluation is based on what employees report about their experiences of trust and reaching their full human potential as part of their organization, no matter who they are or what they do. We analyze these experiences relative to each organization’s size, workforce makeup, and what’s typical in their industry and region. The remainder of the evaluation is an assessment of all employees’ daily experiences of the company’s values, people’s ability to contribute new ideas, and the effectiveness of their leaders to ensure they’re consistently experienced.

To ensure surveys truly represent all employees, we require enough people in each organization to respond that results are accurate to a 95% confidence level and 5% margin of error or better. We review any anomalies in survey responses, news, and financial performance to ensure there aren’t any extraordinary reasons to believe we couldn’t trust a company’s survey results.

Categories:
These organizations’ assessment is based 100% on employee responses to the Trust Index survey.

  • Small 10-99 Employees

For larger organizations with more than 100 employees, we also use our Culture Audit™ tool, asking organizations to share with us their practices, policies, and programs to create a great workplace For All™ and evaluate the approach they take.

  • Medium 100-999 Employees
  • Large 1000+ Employees

Why do you say in one place your national list scoring is based on 85%/15% and in another place that it is 75%/25%?

We are explaining two different things:
1.  The criteria we evaluate

  •  85% concerned with Trust and Maximizing Human Potential and
  • 15% concerned with everything else

2.  Where the data comes from

  • 100% Trust Index for organizations with less than 100 employees
  • 75% based on the Trust Index survey analytics and 25% based on responses to the Culture Audit for organizations with more than 100 employees.
For All™ Methodology

Great Place To Work, the global authority on workplace culture, determined the Philippines Best Workplaces™ 2023 List by conducting annual workforce studies through our Trust Index Survey™ and Culture Management platform Emprising®, representing the voices of over 450,000 employees across the Philippines.

Employees responded to over 60 survey questions describing the extent to which their organization creates a great place to work For All™, meaning that the company empowers all individuals to reach their full human potential. Eighty-five percent of the evaluation is based on what employees report about their experiences of trust and reaching their full human potential as part of their organization, no matter who they are or what they do. We analyze these experiences relative to each organization’s size, workforce makeup, and what’s typical in their industry and region. The remainder of the evaluation is an assessment of all employees’ daily experiences of the company’s values, people’s ability to contribute new ideas, and the effectiveness of their leaders to ensure they’re consistently experienced.

To ensure surveys truly represent all employees, we require enough people in each organization to respond that results are accurate to a 95% confidence level and 5% margin of error or better. We review any anomalies in survey responses, news, and financial performance to ensure there aren’t any extraordinary reasons to believe we couldn’t trust a company’s survey results.

Categories:
These organizations’ assessment is based 100% on employee responses to the Trust Index survey.

  • Small 10-99 Employees

For larger organizations with more than 100 employees, we also use our Culture Audit™ tool, asking organizations to share with us their practices, policies, and programs to create a great workplace For All™ and evaluate the approach they take.

  • Medium 100-999 Employees
  • Large 1000+ Employees